Catching Up With: Patricia Vargas – Sugarlift

Catching Up With: Patricia Vargas

Posted by Bartlomiej Piela /

This week we are catching up with Patricia Vargas, an artist based in Chino, California whose abstract creations convey positivity and vibrance through her use of colors and shapes. A painter since the age of ten, Patricia is the founder of Parima Creative Studio. We're honored to be partnering with her and showing her work on Sugarlift! 

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

LIVES & WORKS IN  Chino, CA

OCCUPATION  Artist

ON THE CLOCK  Wake up a 6am, walk the dog, work out, work at home office, answer emails, fulfill orders, update shops, post on social media, and, if I'm lucky that day, I will spend some time painting/creating.

YOUR ART WEEKEND Never ending job of cleaning and organizing the studio.

ALBUM Lioness: Hidden Treasures by Amy Winehouse

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

FILM  Jurassic Park

ARTIST  Claire Elsaesser, Kirsten Sims, Cindy Press

BOOK Currently reading "Z: A Novel of Zelda Fitzgerald" by Therese Anne Fowler and "Anna Karenina" by Leo Tolstoy.

EATS  Mexican street tacos!

LATEST PURCHASE  Groceries

GUILTY PLEASURE  Re-runs of Downton Abbey.

GRADE IN ART CLASS  A

36 HOURS  Paint, go for a walk, visit friends.

Interested in incorporating Patricia's work into your collection? Click here  to learn how.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

We’re picking up pretty good vibes from your paintings and from your portfolio overall -- what inspires you and how does that impact you studio work?

There are several things that inspire me and as an artist I think it's in my nature to always be aware of my surroundings. Everything that I see and hear has a collective effect on my work.

Currently I am really inspired by nature, particularly flowers and plants with interesting colors and patterns. One of my favorite things to do is to explore the many gardens here in Southern California. I just recently visited the Descanso Gardens near Pasadena and they had this beautiful green succulent that I had never seen before. It had thin white lines going up it leaves that made it look like they were drawn in. It almost looked like green marbled stone.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

I am also inspired by interior design. My favorites being eclectic and bright clean design. A well designed space incorporates texture, color, and pattern to create an environment where the visitor feels the energy of the room. This is something that I try to achieve in my paintings.

That being said, I don't have very much decor in my studio, it is mostly plain white with a few plants here and there. I like to take in what I have seen and let the ideas slowly develop. I feel that if my studio was filled with color it would distract me from what I was trying to create.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

Who are some of your biggest influences either in art history or today?

In college we had to do a project where we picked an artist and tried to copy their style to better understand their thought process. I chose the artist Beatriz Milhaze. We had similar color palettes and I was intrigued at the thought of creating non-figurative pieces. Before discovering her work I was mainly painting water and landscape with overly saturated bright colors, and while I loved it I felt like something was missing. Then I started working on the project and felt an immediate connection with creating abstract art. I think it had to do with the fact that I have never been very good at drawing and felt limited to what I could create, and abstract gave me a sense of creative freedom.

As far as artist from history I greatly admire the works from Monet, Rothko, De Kooning, and Matisse.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

Can you talk a little about your process -- when you’re thinking about the next paintings, how do you dream up the next composition?

For me the actual creating process is sporadic. I can't paint everyday. I've tried and it usually leads to me feeling burnt out. I typically go through periods of intense creativity. I will spend several consecutive days cranking out one painting after the other until I can't anymore. Then I take a week or two off. Unless I am being commissioned, that's a different story.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles

While I am painting I try not to think about anything other than what I am creating at that moment. I might have some soft instrumental music playing in the background to help get my creativity flowing, but I mostly paint in complete silence, or I may have a picture up on my board that initially gave me the inspiration to paint. I also have several sketches on my iPad that I can rifle through when I am feeling stuck. Though for the most part I try to be solely present in my actions, letting each brushstroke determine the next and using this time to practice gratitude.

patricia vargas parima studio interview catching up abstract california los angeles


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